Creative Industries Federation shares psychological boost for the UK’s Creative Industries.

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Well, Theresa May has one priority right.
“Monday’s announcement by Prime Minister Theresa May that the creative industries would be one of five named sectors in the new industrial strategy was a major step forward for a sector which has never been formally recognised in a national industrial strategy before. Only six years ago at the start of the coalition government, the creative industries were not formally acknowledged when it announced nine sectors of industrial engagement.”  (Source: Creative Industries Federation)
  • The government has launched a Green Paper/consultation giving a blueprint for a national industrial strategy.
  • Five sectors, including the creative industries, were named in the consultation as having ‘sector deals’.
  • Exactly how government support for chosen sectors will be offered is dependent on the result of the consultation process, although the key mechanisms for support are given in the 10 pillars explored below.
  • In order to attain its three goals, the government has identified 10 pillars that each sector deal should focus on. These are:
    • investment in science, research and innovation
    • developing skills
    • upgrading infrastructure
    • supporting businesses to start and grow
    • improving procurement
    • encouraging trade and inward investment
    • delivering affordable energy and clean growth
    • cultivating world-leading sectors
    • driving growth across the whole country
    • creating the right institutions to bring together sectors and places. (Like Creative Edinburgh)
As the CIF states in its recent circular, not only is this a growing sector (as we have known for several years) but jobs cannot be automated.  Although I’m sure there are plenty of people trying to find a way.
Here’s a couple of efforts to prove my point.
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In Scotland we have been blessed to have a long term appointment in Culture, Tourism and External Affairs in the shape of the enthusiastic and understanding Fiona Hyslop so maybe things are looking up for the sector.
The point is the sector includes not just corporate businesses like design, advertising, film and architecture but also hundreds of thousands of start ups, SMEs and increasingly overlaps with the rapidly growing tech sector.
My role as Chair of Creative Edinburgh is to support our Director Janine Matheson and her team, alongside our enthusiastic board in realising the ambitions of this ‘new deal’ by creating a thriving and increasingly vocal network of exactly those businesses in Edinburgh that can benefit from the strategy.
We are deeply grateful to our funders and sponsors who have made this possible so far, and this initiative can be a positive step forward for a city that can benefit more than most from both Holyrood and Westminster recognition and support.
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Creative Edinburgh is Five. Help us get to Fifty.

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Olaf Furness picking up his Creative Edinburgh Award from a chap in an ill fitting suit.

I’ve been in the Chair at Creative Edinburgh for four years in which time we have grown our membership from virtually zero to over 2,300.

It’s a uniquely aggregated network of everyone from jewellery-makers to promoters, to designers to accountants to film producers and pretty much everything in between.

If it has done one thing only it has exploded the myth that networking is boring, scary and a waste of time.

It has created hundreds of commissions, collaborations and friendships and it has created an energy that is rarely (I actually mean never but I don’t have empiric evidence to prove that…yet) experienced in the professional workplace.

We represent the Creative Industries on an economic development ticket. So we’re not an arts organisation, we’re a membership group that invests time and energy into mentoring, matchmaking, sharing knowledge and space and time and experience with our members; young and old.

I like to think of us as “Edinburgh’s Creative Oxygen.”

We don’t sneer at students. We welcome them. Not in a token way, we embrace them.

We don’t see our older members (like me) as past it. We see them as wise and connected.

And useful.

One, two and three person businesses, and freelancers, are manifold in our membership. That’s because Scotland is a nation of SME’s and self employed.

It’s what Scotland is and the sooner we recognise that and accept that the emerging economy is based precisely on that business model, the better.

But we also welcome and enjoy the experiences of our larger member organisations.

We even go out and train some of Scotland’s largest corporations.

But we rely on knowledge, passion and commitment to survive and thrive.

We’re at a crossroads in our development. We want to march on but we need help.

We need knowledge too.

That knowledge will come from an important member survey (that non-members can fill in too). You know me (you’re connected to me after all).

Please, take 15 minutes out to fill in this nicely designed questionnaire. (FYI, it’s been created in a great new tool that competes with Survey Monkey called Typeform and is rather good.)

Thank you my friend. It means a lot to me.

https://creativeedinburgh.typeform.com/to/XcSv9a

Oops. Agency jumps the gun. Or was it the client?

Lorem ipsum… is the most commonly used marketing communications typography in the Western world, but the public have never heard of it.  That’s because it’s called ‘placeholder type’ that shows how the actual copy will LOOK but nor READ (obviously) once the design has been approved.

It made me smile to receive this email this morning. (Read the first para.)

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I put it into Google translate out of interest and it turns out I am being offered a live casino skirt vehicle.

In fact, multiple.

A fleet perhaps.

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The Freddo Investment paradigm.

Today Cadbury owners Mondelez announced that the cost of a Freddo Bar is to rise by 20%.  The price hike is being blamed on the rise in the pound in the wake of Britain’s farcical Brexit decision.

A spokesperson for Mondelez said in defence of the move; “Increasing prices is always a last resort, but to ensure we can keep people’s favourite brands on shelf and look after the 4,500 people we employ in the UK, we are having to make some selective price increases across our range.”

But this is a fabrication of Trumplike proportions as research by Think Hard has unearthed this startling graph that shows Freddos have been bankrolling Mondelez for years.

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(Source: Vouchercloud)

This startling revelation, unearthed in July 2016, revealed that the cost of a Freddo had outstripped inflation by almost 200% making it a massively lucrative investment.  Indeed, in the period Jan 2000 to July 2016 the FTSE100 had risen by a mere 9% making a Freddo 17 times more effective as an investment than stocks like RBS, Lloyds Banking Group and Ratners.

So it’s even more shocking to see that this 150% rise in value is to be ramped up to a return of 200% when Mondelez and Cadbury get their greedy fingers on the chocolate Rana Temporaria. 

It’s clear that investment returns on the Freddo will be anything but temporaria.

Think Hard rating: BUY in large quantities immediately.